Women and health

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The theme for International Women’s Day 2018 is #pressforprogress, progress for equality for all, progress for ending violence against women, girls and other vulnerable people. Newcastle has been at the forefront of women’s radical action, from the Suffragettes plotting to break windows as they drank tea in Fenwick’s café in the 1900s, to the first Women’s Liberation conference held outside London in the 1970s, to being one of only four British cities to host a Slutwalk in 2011.

Improving the healthcare response to domestic violence and abuse in sexual health clinics: feasibility study of a training, support and referral intervention

Sexual health and gynaecological problems are the most consistent and largest physical health differences between abused and non-abused female populations. Sexual health services are well placed to identify and support patients experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Most sexual health professionals have had minimal DVA training despite English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommendations.

Sexual health professionals should be supported to ask about domestic abuse

Sexual health professionals feel that it is appropriate and valuable to ask their patients about domestic violence and abuse, National Institute for Health Research-funded research at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London has found. But time, workload and finding the right moment during consultations can be barriers to doing so.

Councils warn that sexual health services are at tipping point

The Local Government Association (LGA), which represents more than 370 councils in England and Wales, says that sexual health services are at a tipping point after demand increased by a quarter in the past five years, while funding has been cut.In 2016 there were 2,456,779 new attendances at sexual health clinics compared with 1,941,801 in 2012. The LGA says that the Government’s cuts to councils’ public health budgets of £531 million – a reduction of nearly 10 per cent – has left local authorities struggling to keep up with increased demand for sexual he

Mental health in prisons

Government does not know how many people in prison have a mental illness, how much it is spending on mental health in prisons or whether it is achieving its objectives. It is therefore hard to see how Government can be achieving value for money in its efforts to improve the mental health and well being of prisoners, according to the report by the National Audit Office.


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