Women and economy

Aspire Programme Chester-le-Street

We would like to shout out that there are still places available on the following courses:

  • Updating Your CV 
  • Move on with Maths
  • Sugar Craft Flowers
  • Understanding Alcohol Misuse
  • Change Your Life
  • Health Awareness
  • Explore Local History
  • Goal Setting and Smart Targeting

 

Our other services will also return for 2020 (no booking/referral required but women do need to sign up as Aspire members):

Mondays:

NEPACS Early Days in Custody Family Support Project Posts

‘Early Days in Custody’ Family Support Project

Application deadline: Sunday, 2 February, 2020 - 00:00

Based: Durham Fixed

FT Project Co-ordinator - £28,050 per annum

Family Support Worker(s) Salary £24,823 Pro Rata

1 post 37.5 hours based at HMP Durham

1 post 18.75 hours based at Low Newton   

Funded by the National Lottery Communities Fund until March 2023

Nepacs is a regional charity which supports positive futures for prisoners and their families. 

Can Free Trade Agreements help secure gender equality and social justice?

It is now clear that the United Kingdom will leave the European Union at the end of January. It’s more important than ever to talk about how to centre gender equality and social justice in international trading arrangements.

Trade is highly political. Its effects are felt by women in multiple roles: as consumers, producers, workers, users of public services and, providers of unpaid care work. The government has made a commitment to gender equal trade policy but what does this mean in practice? How can we ensure trade agreements benefit women here and around the world.

Sisters Doing It For Themselves

The Women’s Voluntary and Community Sector (WVCS) grew out of the Women’s Liberation Movement (WLM) which will be celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2020. The contribution of the WVCS in advancing women’s rights is largely undocumented.  Many of the women who were involved in setting up women’s organisations and campaigning for change are now in their late 50s and 60s. Their struggles and achievements have remained largely invisible. 

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