Ending violence against women and girls

Stop planned changes to funding for women's refuges

Immediately halt dangerous planned changes to the way that women's domestic abuse refuges are funded, as they could put women's and children’s lives at risk.

Work with Women's Aid and other partners to ensure that the national network of women's refuges is given a model of funding that will protect services in the long term.

Why is this important?

New government funding plans threaten to dismantle our life-saving national network of refuges and put the lives of women and children trying to escape domestic abuse at risk.

Untangling the concept of coercive control: Theorizing domestic violent crime

The article assesses three approaches to domestic violence: two that use the concept of ‘coercive control’ and one that uses ‘domestic violent crime’. These are: Stark’s concept of coercive control; Johnson’s distinction between situational couple violence and intimate terrorism, in which coercive control is confined to the latter; and that of domestic violent crime, in which all physical violence is conceptualized as coercive and controlling. The article assesses these three approaches on seven issues.

Ending Violence Against Women in Europe: An Exploration of Philanthropic Giving

This report is a response to the need for deeper knowledge about the current state of affairs regarding efforts to end violence against women (VAW) in Europe. As the first exploration of current trends, priorities and levels of funding among philanthropy and civil society organisations working on this issue, this study aims to inform further discussion among stakeholders, in particular donors, on potential strategies for action in this field.

Domestic violence and abuse: help from DWP

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has produced a guide for domestic violence and abuse victims about the services and support they offer. This includes special conditions for:

  • Housing Benefit
  • Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Employment and Support Allowance
  • Universal Credit
  • The benefit cap
  • Removal of the spare room subsidy
  • Discretionary Housing Payments
  • Migrant partner support
  • Child maintenance

Sexual harassment of women and girls in public places inquiry

The Women and Equalities Committee launches a new inquiry into sexual harassment of women and girls in public places. The Committee held a one-off evidence session on women's experiences of everyday sexism and sexual harassment in December 2017, following the emergence of widespread allegations in the UK and US about sexual assault and harassment across a wide range of sectors.

Identifying the factors that facilitate women who have experienced sexual assault to attend their cervical smear test

Royal Holloway University and the My Body Back project have launched a study to understand more about what factors may be related to how often women who have experienced sexual assault intend to and do attend their cervical smear. This is with the hope to inform support for those who do not regularly attend. The study is all based online, and will take approximately 20-40 minutes to complete and involve a few questionnaires. No personally identifiable information will be asked of you so your data will be stored with a participant ID number.

Developing bystander responses to sexual harassment among young people

In 2014 the Fundamental Rights Agency found that sexual harassment was the most prevalent form of violence against girls and women, across the 28 EU member states. A promising new approach to the prevention of sexual harassment is targeting young people as bystanders, inviting them to notice and intervene in sexual harassment situations.

SafeLives Guidance: Domestic abuse practitioners giving evidence in court

Due to the police’s requirement to record third party evidence, and as practitioners are increasingly based within remote locations - such as hospitals and police stations, where they may be witnessing domestic abuse incidents or evidence of abuse - they may be increasingly asked to make third party reports or statements to the police. In some cases, this could lead to a summons or request to give evidence in criminal court. SafeLives has produced guidance for domestic abuse practitioners giving evidence in court

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ending violence against women and girls