VAWG & Health

Covid-19: Gender and other Equality Issues

Key Points - there will be regular updates in this fast-moving situation.
• Covid-19 is a global public health crisis and an economic crisis which impacts on different groups including
women, BAME communities and disabled people, differently. Therefore, a response that takes into account
different groups’ positioning in society and in the economy is necessary:
• The Government must support businesses to continue paying their staff if they cannot operate.
• Both eligibility for, and rate of, Statutory Sick Pay must increase.

Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Violence against Women and Girls

A research briefing written in response to the query: What is the evidence of how the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic2 might impact on violence against women and girls (VAWG)? Please draw on any emerging global evidence from the current outbreak in corona virus, as well as other similar epidemics? (e.g. Ebola)
Enquirer: Victoria Spencer, DFID VAWG Team

Staying safe during COVID-19 A guide for victims and survivors of domestic abuse

Our message to victims and survivors of domestic abuse
We know that if you are currently experiencing or have experienced domestic abuse you will know what being isolated and frightened will feel like. You might be worried about self-isolating with someone who is harming you. We’ve created this to help you think about what you might do over the coming weeks to stay safe.
You are not alone in this.
You are a survivor, equipped with the knowledge, strength and tools that help keep you and your family safe every day.

Women who are experiencing domestic abuse are nearly three times as likely to develop mental illness – new research published

Academics at the University of Birmingham have identified a significant association between mental illness and domestic abuse in UK women.

Up until now, there has been confusion whether the mental illness or the abuse came first and very few previous studies have been able to demonstrate the direction of the relationship.

This new study is the first of its kind in the UK to clearly show that the relationship runs both ways and the key findings were:

The independent review of the Mental Health Act: Interim Report

This independent review of the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) was commissioned by the government in October 2017. Our terms of reference ask us to make recommendations for improvement in relation to rising detention rates, racial disparities in detention, and concerns that the act is out of step with a modern mental health system. We were asked to look at both legislation and practice, with recommendations extending to England in relation to matters that are devolved in Wales (including health), and England and Wales in relation to non-devolved matters (including justice). 

While your back was turned: How mental health policymakers stopped paying attention to the specific needs of women and girls

The mental health of young women and girls is deteriorating, and the gap between men and women has widened over recent years. As the evidence section in this paper will show, the last fifteen years have seen an unprecedented rise in reported mental health problems amongst young women and girls. We now see their needs reaching crisis levels.

Mental health in prisons

Government does not know how many people in prison have a mental illness, how much it is spending on mental health in prisons or whether it is achieving its objectives. It is therefore hard to see how Government can be achieving value for money in its efforts to improve the mental health and well being of prisoners, according to the report by the National Audit Office.

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