Sexual violence and harassment

Coercing reluctant witnesses - who's really at risk?

Survivors of rape need and deserve many things in the aftermath of this uniquely devastating crime, and the chance to receive justice for what happened is certainly one of them. What they do not need is for the devastation they have already experienced to be compounded by the very system which is supposed to protect them. Blog post by Rape Crisis Scotland exploring the impact of the Criminal Justice process on survivors. 

Kaleidoscopic Justice Sexual Violence and Victim-Survivors’ Perceptions of Justice

This article proposes a more multifaceted way of thinking about victim-survivors’ perceptions of justice; what we have termed ‘kaleidoscopic justice’. Developed from an empirical investigation with 20 victim-survivors of sexual violence, kaleidoscopic justice understands justice as a constantly shifting pattern; justice constantly refracted through new experiences or understandings; justice as an ever-evolving, nuanced and lived experience.

Not worth reporting: Women’s experiences of drug-facilitated sexual assault

Dominant narratives around the links between sexual violence and alcohol or other drug use are often problematic, if not outright victim-blaming. This includes public awareness campaigns that seek to limit women’s freedom of movement and expression through advice to limit drinking or take taxis home from bars, through to jury attitudes that result in women being seen as less ‘reliable’ witnesses in court if they were intoxicated at the time of the offence.

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: Creating an evidence‑based resource for police and legal practitioners

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years (Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS], 2016). Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes. Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common (Cossins, 2013). This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime.

Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools

This inquiry has uncovered the scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools across England which must be acted upon urgently. The evidence we have gathered paints a concerning picture: the sexual harassment and abuse of girls being accepted as part of daily life; children of primary school age learning about sex and relationships through exposure to hard-core pornography; teachers accepting sexual harassment as being “just banter”; and parents struggling to know how they can best support their children.

Practitioner views on the impacts, challenges and barriers in supporting older survivors of sexual violence

Despite half a century of research on both sexual violence and elder abuse, the intersection between the two remains largely unexplored. Using theoretical lenses of feminist criminology and critical feminist gerontology this article explores the intersection between age and sexual violence drawing on interviews with 23 practitioners supporting older survivors (aged 60 and over). They reported physical and emotional effects of sexual violence leading to limited lifestyles, disengagement from social networks and reliance on pathogenic coping strategies.

Rape Monitoring Group data 2015-16 - Northumbria

On behalf of the national Rape Monitoring Group, HMIC publishes local area digests to provide a data set to enable more thorough analysis of how rape is dealt with in a particular area of England and Wales. This digest sets out the data for Durham Constabulary. These local area digests pull together a range of Home Office/Office for National Statistics, Crown Prosecution Service and Ministry of Justice data on rape in one place.


Subscribe to RSS - Sexual violence and harassment