Sexual violence and harassment

In the Belfast rape trial, I’m haunted by the man who couldn’t stand up to his friends

How the trial of four rugby players exposed a deep seam of misogyny. Sometimes, a cold recital of the facts has more force than yards of the most thunderous polemic. After a night in which a group of rugby players had a sexual encounter with a woman at a party, one of the men sent a volley of messages to the friend who took her home.

Coercing reluctant witnesses - who's really at risk?

Survivors of rape need and deserve many things in the aftermath of this uniquely devastating crime, and the chance to receive justice for what happened is certainly one of them. What they do not need is for the devastation they have already experienced to be compounded by the very system which is supposed to protect them. Blog post by Rape Crisis Scotland exploring the impact of the Criminal Justice process on survivors. 

Kaleidoscopic Justice Sexual Violence and Victim-Survivors’ Perceptions of Justice

This article proposes a more multifaceted way of thinking about victim-survivors’ perceptions of justice; what we have termed ‘kaleidoscopic justice’. Developed from an empirical investigation with 20 victim-survivors of sexual violence, kaleidoscopic justice understands justice as a constantly shifting pattern; justice constantly refracted through new experiences or understandings; justice as an ever-evolving, nuanced and lived experience.

Not worth reporting: Women’s experiences of drug-facilitated sexual assault

Dominant narratives around the links between sexual violence and alcohol or other drug use are often problematic, if not outright victim-blaming. This includes public awareness campaigns that seek to limit women’s freedom of movement and expression through advice to limit drinking or take taxis home from bars, through to jury attitudes that result in women being seen as less ‘reliable’ witnesses in court if they were intoxicated at the time of the offence.

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: Creating an evidence‑based resource for police and legal practitioners

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years (Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS], 2016). Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes. Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common (Cossins, 2013). This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime.

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