Publications

Peace of Mind – An evaluation of Refuge Access for All

As a response to the increasing number of women coming into refuges with mental health and drug and alcohol issues, Solace looked at how we could provide a more inclusive response to women’s needs and recovery from the trauma they had experienced. The Refuge Access for All project was established to improve our response. At the heart of this was the creation of a Psychologically Informed Environment (PIE) across Solace Refuges.

Tallawah: A briefing paper on black and ‘minority ethnic’ women and girls organising to end violence against us.

This paper seeks to provide a framework for understanding the nature, and the importance of, specialist organisations which are led by Black and ‘minority ethnic’ (BME) women and which work to address al forms of violence against BME women and girls. We have deliberately chosen to speak in terms of ‘us’ and ‘we’, as recognition that violence against women and girls is widespread and devastating in its effects; and has direct and indirect impacts on the lives of all women and girls. Published by Imkaan. 

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: Creating an evidence‑based resource for police and legal practitioners

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years (Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS], 2016). Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes. Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common (Cossins, 2013). This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime.

Improving the healthcare response to domestic violence and abuse in sexual health clinics: feasibility study of a training, support and referral intervention

Sexual health and gynaecological problems are the most consistent and largest physical health differences between abused and non-abused female populations. Sexual health services are well placed to identify and support patients experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Most sexual health professionals have had minimal DVA training despite English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommendations.

Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools

This inquiry has uncovered the scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools across England which must be acted upon urgently. The evidence we have gathered paints a concerning picture: the sexual harassment and abuse of girls being accepted as part of daily life; children of primary school age learning about sex and relationships through exposure to hard-core pornography; teachers accepting sexual harassment as being “just banter”; and parents struggling to know how they can best support their children.

Practitioner views on the impacts, challenges and barriers in supporting older survivors of sexual violence

Despite half a century of research on both sexual violence and elder abuse, the intersection between the two remains largely unexplored. Using theoretical lenses of feminist criminology and critical feminist gerontology this article explores the intersection between age and sexual violence drawing on interviews with 23 practitioners supporting older survivors (aged 60 and over). They reported physical and emotional effects of sexual violence leading to limited lifestyles, disengagement from social networks and reliance on pathogenic coping strategies.

Women's Aid Impact Report 2016-2017

"The Women’s Aid movement is one of the most important achievements of feminism in this country. The struggle over decades, led by survivors of domestic abuse themselves, to establish the network of specialist services that now saves countless lives, continues to this day. This is not just a struggle for funding: it is also a struggle for understanding, for recognition, for women to be heard and believed. That’s why Women’s Aid can never be just a federation of organisations.

Peer Talk: Hidden Stories

A Participatory Research Project with Women Who Sell or Swap Sex in Teesside 

A Way Out is proud to have led on this research project, which has produced a detailed picture of how, where and why women sell sex, including issues associated with their personal journey into and out of sex work. A key aim of the project was to inform and shape commissioning and provision of services for a group of women, largely hidden, excluded from society and frequently distanced from the services which could help them to change their lives.

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