Publications

Guide to new Domestic Violence Legal Aid Gateway Evidence

Legal Aid is available for those who have experienced or are at risk of experiencing domestic violence for private family law cases. The provision for this is under Regulation 33 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO), which lists the types of evidence that the Legal Aid Agency will accept to grant legal aid in these circumstances.

Evidence-Based Policing of Domestic Abuse

However police agencies may choose to re-allocate their domestic abuse resource portfolio, the evidence-based model for testing innovations should be clear. There are both ethical and political reasons to introduce domestic abuse strategies with the same care as public health strategies. Both CARA and the Bracknell Forest ICMP were tested with as much rigour as testing a new pharmaceutical. If two English police agencies can do this, we suggest that others can follow their lead.

Sex Discrimination Law Review

A ground-breaking report released by the Fawcett Society concludes that our legal system is failing women and needs fundamental reform. The report, which is the conclusion of the Fawcett Society’s Sex Discrimination Law Review (SDLR) Panel, also found that violence against women and girls is ‘endemic’ in the UK.

Young Women's Decades Project

Investing in Children are supporting a  group of young women as young researchers funded by Young Roots Heritage Lottery Program.

The group is made up of 12 young women from distinctive backgrounds from across County Durham who have begun their research and want to take a North East perspective. The overall aim of their project is to promote what women bring to North East communities. Ideas are emerging to develop a resource pack to empower young women (a book or an app possibly) based on the contributions women bring to the North East through Heritage and their stories.

Untangling the concept of coercive control: Theorizing domestic violent crime

The article assesses three approaches to domestic violence: two that use the concept of ‘coercive control’ and one that uses ‘domestic violent crime’. These are: Stark’s concept of coercive control; Johnson’s distinction between situational couple violence and intimate terrorism, in which coercive control is confined to the latter; and that of domestic violent crime, in which all physical violence is conceptualized as coercive and controlling. The article assesses these three approaches on seven issues.

Ending Violence Against Women in Europe: An Exploration of Philanthropic Giving

This report is a response to the need for deeper knowledge about the current state of affairs regarding efforts to end violence against women (VAW) in Europe. As the first exploration of current trends, priorities and levels of funding among philanthropy and civil society organisations working on this issue, this study aims to inform further discussion among stakeholders, in particular donors, on potential strategies for action in this field.

Not worth reporting: Women’s experiences of drug-facilitated sexual assault

Dominant narratives around the links between sexual violence and alcohol or other drug use are often problematic, if not outright victim-blaming. This includes public awareness campaigns that seek to limit women’s freedom of movement and expression through advice to limit drinking or take taxis home from bars, through to jury attitudes that result in women being seen as less ‘reliable’ witnesses in court if they were intoxicated at the time of the offence.

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