Publications

The Future of Gender Equality in the UK

Last year Rosa, the UK Fund for women and girls, spent time pondering the question: what could the UK look like in 10 years' time, if greater attention is paid to tackling gender inequality? It's a huge topic, so they zoomed in on the theme of work, looking at the part-time economy, pregnancy discrimination, the gender pay gap, and sexual harassment. The result has now been produced in a report, The Future of Gender Equality in the UK.

Welfare Safety Net

The Work and Pensions Committee have released a report on the welfare safety net. They have cited the work research of Women's Budget Group and made reference to gender disparities.

The future is ours: Women, automation and equality in the digital age

Automation will produce significant productivity gains that will reshape specific sectors and occupations. These gains are likely to be recirculated, with jobs reallocated rather than eliminated, economic output increased, and new sources of wealth created. The problem is likely to be one of how income and wealth are distributed. Automation could create a ‘paradox of plenty’: society would be far richer in aggregate, but, for many individuals and communities, technological change could reinforce inequalities of power and reward.

A home of her own, housing and women

Housing is one of the most urgent public policy issues in the UK . Our housing system is in crisis and the causes and impacts of that crisis are gendered. The report A home of her own, women and housing shows that housing is unaffordable for women in every English region. 

Read the full report here 

Read the executive summary here

'Disparate in Voice, Sympathetic in Direction’: Gendered Political Blackness and the Politics of Solidarity

While political blackness seems to be making quite a comeback, this resurgence has also met with frustration and ambivalence. This paper aims to make sense of why this mobilising concept is accepted in some contemporary black feminist circles and outright rejected in others. It unpicks the diasporic dimensions of political blackness, reflecting on the issues that converged to foreground ‘black’ as the basis for mobilising women of African and Asian decent to engage in collective activism.

Shattering Lives and Myths

How do victim-survivors experience image-based sexual abuse? The study, which was co-authored by professor Erika Rackley, from the University of Kent, and Dr Kelly Johnson of Durham University, called for image-based abuses to be reclassified as sexual offences.

It warned that current laws were a “patchwork of piecemeal and out-of-date provisions with many significant gaps”, with some requiring proof of sexual gratification or distress as motives for a charge. 

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