Publications

Untangling the concept of coercive control: Theorizing domestic violent crime

The article assesses three approaches to domestic violence: two that use the concept of ‘coercive control’ and one that uses ‘domestic violent crime’. These are: Stark’s concept of coercive control; Johnson’s distinction between situational couple violence and intimate terrorism, in which coercive control is confined to the latter; and that of domestic violent crime, in which all physical violence is conceptualized as coercive and controlling. The article assesses these three approaches on seven issues.

Ending Violence Against Women in Europe: An Exploration of Philanthropic Giving

This report is a response to the need for deeper knowledge about the current state of affairs regarding efforts to end violence against women (VAW) in Europe. As the first exploration of current trends, priorities and levels of funding among philanthropy and civil society organisations working on this issue, this study aims to inform further discussion among stakeholders, in particular donors, on potential strategies for action in this field.

Not worth reporting: Women’s experiences of drug-facilitated sexual assault

Dominant narratives around the links between sexual violence and alcohol or other drug use are often problematic, if not outright victim-blaming. This includes public awareness campaigns that seek to limit women’s freedom of movement and expression through advice to limit drinking or take taxis home from bars, through to jury attitudes that result in women being seen as less ‘reliable’ witnesses in court if they were intoxicated at the time of the offence.

Peace of Mind – An evaluation of Refuge Access for All

As a response to the increasing number of women coming into refuges with mental health and drug and alcohol issues, Solace looked at how we could provide a more inclusive response to women’s needs and recovery from the trauma they had experienced. The Refuge Access for All project was established to improve our response. At the heart of this was the creation of a Psychologically Informed Environment (PIE) across Solace Refuges.

Tallawah: A briefing paper on black and ‘minority ethnic’ women and girls organising to end violence against us.

This paper seeks to provide a framework for understanding the nature, and the importance of, specialist organisations which are led by Black and ‘minority ethnic’ (BME) women and which work to address al forms of violence against BME women and girls. We have deliberately chosen to speak in terms of ‘us’ and ‘we’, as recognition that violence against women and girls is widespread and devastating in its effects; and has direct and indirect impacts on the lives of all women and girls. Published by Imkaan. 

Challenging misconceptions about sexual offending: Creating an evidence‑based resource for police and legal practitioners

Reports of sexual offences crimes have increased over the last six years (Australian Bureau of Statistics [ABS], 2016). Despite the prevalence of sexual offending in our communities, there is a lack of understanding about these crimes. Myths and misconceptions about sexual offending are common (Cossins, 2013). This is understandable, because sexual offending is a profoundly hidden crime.

Improving the healthcare response to domestic violence and abuse in sexual health clinics: feasibility study of a training, support and referral intervention

Sexual health and gynaecological problems are the most consistent and largest physical health differences between abused and non-abused female populations. Sexual health services are well placed to identify and support patients experiencing domestic violence and abuse (DVA). Most sexual health professionals have had minimal DVA training despite English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommendations.

Sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools

This inquiry has uncovered the scale and impact of sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools across England which must be acted upon urgently. The evidence we have gathered paints a concerning picture: the sexual harassment and abuse of girls being accepted as part of daily life; children of primary school age learning about sex and relationships through exposure to hard-core pornography; teachers accepting sexual harassment as being “just banter”; and parents struggling to know how they can best support their children.

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