Less than a third of young men prosecuted for rape are convicted

Last week The Guardian reported on new figures showing men aged 18-24 less likely to be found guilty of rape than older men in England and Wales. The crisis engulfing the criminal justice system over its approach to rape cases is revealed by startling figures that show less than a third of prosecutions brought against young men result in a conviction. According to statistics, men aged 18 to 24 in England and Wales are consistently less likely to be found guilty than older men on trial.

Funding boost to help pupils affected by domestic abuse

The Home Office has awarded charity Operation Encompass £163,000 for its vital initiative to support children who attend school following a domestic abuse incident. Operation Encompass is a system which ensures the police contact a school before the next school day when one of their pupils has been exposed to domestic abuse. This allows a school’s safeguarding team to make sure the appropriate support is in place to give the pupil the assistance they need.

Healthy and unhealthy relationships

Childline has launched a campaign to help young people understand the difference between healthy and unhealthy relationships, and help them identify signs that their relationship might not be quite right. 'Looking out for Lottie’, an eight part series, follows a fictional character Lottie who gets into an unhealthy relationship, showing how grooming can happen without realising it.  

Women's Fund and Tampon Tax Community Fund opportunities in the North East

The Women’s Fund is now open for applications and now able to offer larger grants, up to £5,000.  The fund previously awarded grants up to £3,000 so this is a significant change and it's hoped it will encourage more applications.  Full details are on the Community Foundation website and applicants should use the standard Community Foundation online application process, simply indicating that your application is for consideration by the Women

A quiet crisis: local government spending on disadvantage

Lloyds Bank Foundation commissioned this independent research by the New Policy Institute to find out how English local authorities are supporting people facing disadvantage. It explores how local services have fare during a sustained period of severe financial pressure on local government finances and whether this experience differs across the country. 

Sexual safety on mental health wards

The Care Quality Commission has published a report sharing their findings and recommendations after reviewing incidents related to sexual safety on mental health wards. In 2017, following concerns raised on an inspection of a mental health trust, the CQC carried out a review of reports on patient safety incidents that staff had submitted through the NHS National Reporting and Learning System. We found that many reports described sexual safety incidents, including sexual assault and harassment.

Jumping through hoops

In 2017, Agenda and AVA published Mapping the Maze, which provided a broad picture of the support that homelessness, substance misuse, mental health and criminal justice services are providing to women. Jumping through hoops: How are coordinated responses to multiple disadvantage meeting the needs of women?  explores the experiences of local areas across the country that are seeking to bring such services together to develop a more coordinated response for individuals facing multiple disadvantage, either using the MEAM Approach

Safe and Equal resource

AVA’s resource, Safe and Equal: A Guide on Young People and Meaningful Participation for the Violence Against Women and Girls Sector is now available to download. This guide aims to provide an overview of the issues to consider when undertaking meaningful participation with young survivors of abuse and multiple disadvantage. The guide is primarily for practitioners working within the Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) sector but may also be of use to funders and commissioners.

Domestic abuse victims turning to civil courts because police are failing to enforce law

Last week, The Telegraph reported on how domestic abuse victims are increasingly turning to the civil courts for protection because the police are failing to enforce the law of coercive control. Despite more than 4,200 complaints being made to police last year across England and Wales, less than ten per cent of those cases resulted in prosecutions with even less ending in convictions. Read the full article here

Pages

Subscribe to Front page feed